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Macadamia Nut Oil on sale
WAS:  (EX. VAT) 100 ml £4.09
Price: (inc. VAT) £4.09

NOW: (EX. VAT) 100 ml £3.48
Price: (inc. VAT) £3.48

Macadamia Nut Oil

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A richly hydrating oil excellent for restoring dry and dehydrated skin to supple and healthy looking skin. Very protective and leaves the skin feeling soft and smooth.

15% off!

Best before date of end of September 2019. If you are viewing this page in our Vegetable Oils category and not on our Short Dated Deals page click here to read about why shorter dates don't mean the product isn't as good as new and they can be a great bargain!

A pale yellow oil with a very slight fatty odour that has been obtained by expeller pressing of the ripe seed of the macadamia tree. The oil has then been refined and deodorised.

Typical Fatty Acid Profile
C16:0 Palmitic Acid 8% to 12%
C16:1 Palmitoleic Acid (Omega 7) 9% to 24%
C18:0 Stearic Acid 2% to 4%
C18:1 Oleic Acid (Omega 9) 53% to 67%
C18:2 Linoleic Acid (Omega 6) 2% to 7%
C18:3 Alpha Linolenic Acid (Omega 3) max 0.5%

Saponification Value mgKOH / g 185-200

Inci:

Macadamia Integrifolia Seed Oil
According to the Cosmetic Ingredient Database (Cosing), the functions of Macadamia Nut Oil are:

Emollient

To view more information, visit the Cosing Database here.
Skin Care
As it has good levels of Omega 7 which is not very common in vegetable oils, it will hydrate the skin very well and lock moisture in to keep it supple and flexible.

It is anti inflammatory and helps to soothe dry and irritated skin conditions restoring elasticity and comfort to the area.

Palmitoleic acid is found in young people’s skin but levels diminish drastically as we age. Macadamia Nut Oil is a rich source of this antioxidant acid and tones aged or very dry skin to restore a youthful appearance. It decreases the depth of wrinkles by cellular regeneration and also diminishes rough skin.

The oil feels extremely rich and sinks into the skin slowly making it idea for massage oil blends and massage creams. It leaves the skin feeling very soft and smooth.

One of the first choice oils to use with mature and very dehydrated skin types. It is even better when blended with Omega 3 oils to enhance the absorption.

Emollient and protective to the skin and enhances the lipid barrier improving hydration levels. Works very well with Jojoba Oil for this purpose.

Hair Care
By conditioning the scalp, dandruff will be reduced. I also helps keep the hair soft and thicker without feeling sticky.

Regular use of the oil in hair products helps the hair to hold its sheen for longer with a more glossy appearance.

It makes dry, curly hair much more flexible and easier to manage.

Other
Use 1% to 100%.

Oil soluble so cannot be used in water only products. It can be used in small amounts in water based gels that will hold it in suspension.

Heat stable so can be used in Stage 1 (fat stage) when making creams and lotions.

Suggested Blends
Blend with Kiwi Seed Oil to for mature and very dry skin types. Use in rich night creams or serums.

If you like a very rich oil blend for your skin, combine with Avocado Oil or Avocado Butter along with 3% Vitamin E.

Cautions/Contraindications
None, unless you have a nut allergy.
Massage Lotion / Barrier Lotion
Stage 1: (above 75°C)

19% Macadamia Nut Oil
9% Baobab Oil
6% Jojoba Oil
5% Castor Oil
9% Vegetal

Stage 2: (above 75°C)
43% Boiling Spring Water

Stage 3: (below 40°C)
3% Comfrey Glycerol Extract
2% Vitamin B3
-------------------
2% Vitamin E
1% Preservative 12
1% Essential Oils of your choice
100% Total

Method:

Heat Stage 1 (fat stage) in a stainless steel bowl on a double boiler until the temperature is above 75°C.

When Stage 1 (fat stage) is at temperature, add Stage 2 (water stage) ingredients into a larger stainless steel bowl or beaker.

Pour Stage 1 into Stage 2 and use a stick blender (high shear) to emulsify the two stages. This will happen in just a few seconds so keep checking. Ensure the temperature is above 75°C. When you lift the stick blender out of the mixture, the mix running off the blender head should look like a thin cream. If it looks granular or like it is separating, it needs more high shear blending.

When it has emulsified, take it out of the double boiler and use a spatula to stir it whilst it is cooling down. You can use a cold water bath to speed up the cooling. Do not continue to use the stick blender as this will destroy the liquid crystal structure that the emulsification has formed.

When it is under 40°C, dissolve the Vitamin B3 in the Comfrey Glycerol Extract, then add the remaining Stage 3 (heat sensitive) ingredients. Combine thoroughly, jar and label.


Rich, Nourishing Face Oil for Dull and Dehydrated Skin
Stage 1: (room temperature)

27% Macadamia Nut Oil
23% Evening Primrose Oil
21% Camelina Oil
11% Avocado Oil
2% Pomegranate Seed Oil
2% Remodelling Intense
2% Eco Marine Algae Extract
11% Vitamin E
0.5% Rosemary Antioxidant
0.5% Essential Oils of your choice
100% Total

Method:

Combine all the ingredients and stir thoroughly. Bottle and label.


For more information and guidance on making your own skin care products please see Aromantic's books and eBooks in our Publications section.

These notes are not meant to replace medical guidance and you should seek the advice of your doctor for your health matters. The formulae are given in good faith and are intended for educational purposes only. They have not been evaluated or tested in any way and Aromantic Ltd. makes no claim as to their effectiveness. It is up to the reader to ensure that any products they produce from these recipes are safe to use, and if relevant, compliant under current cosmetic regulations.
Traditional Aromatherapy Uses
Traditionally used by qualified aromatherapists for its esoteric qualities. It calms and soothes itchy skin which can be a problem during hormonal changes. The silky skin feel adds to a level of luxury and self care.

Historical Information
Native to Australia, the macadamia nut was part of the staple diet of the indigenous Aboriginal people.

In the 1930’s the tree was starting to be cultivated in Hawaii after which it became one of the main sources of production.
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