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Myrrh Oil - Commiphora Myrrha image
(EX. VAT) 5 ml £6.89
Price: (inc. VAT) £8.27

Myrrh Oil - Commiphora Myrrha

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A warm, rich, smoky, slightly spicy, medicinal odour.

A pale yellow to amber, viscous oil obtained by steam distillation of the gum/resin of the small Myrrh tree.

Inci:

Commiphora myrrha Oil

According to the Cosmetic Ingredient Database (Cosing), the functions of Myrrh Essential Oil are:

 

Masking, Skin Conditioning, Tonic

 

To view more information, visit the Cosing Database here.

Skin Care

Excellent for chapped and cracked skin, so include it is gardener's hand creams.

 

Use in foot creams for athlete’s foot where as well as being fungicidal, it helps stops itching skin.

 

Include in sports lotions and gels as it improves the circulation around joints and muscles.

 

For men, it also helps to calm down “jock itch”.

 

As it is astringent and antibacterial, it is excellent to help dry out over greasy, acne prone skin and boils.

 

It dramatically speeds up the healing process of damaged skin.

 

Hair Care

Stops itchy scalp when used in shampoos and conditioners.

 

Other

Use with Frankincense for cleansing a room on an esoteric level.

 

Suggested Blends

With Calendula infused oil as an antifungal in foot creams.

 

Cautions/Contraindications

Do not use in excess and not at all during pregnancy.
Warning: Essential oils can be toxic to some animals. Consult a veterinary surgeon if concerned. 

Traditional Aromatherapy Uses

Traditionally used by qualified aromatherapists where there are thick exudations or lots of mucous like thick, caked throats or with gingivitis.

 

It cleanses the mouth and gums after dental work.

 

It will shift stubborn catarrh and help dry out upper respiratory tract infections.

 

Excellent for treating haemorrhoids.

 

Helps stops the itching with weeping eczema.

 

Used as a uterine stimulant to promote menstruation.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3796379/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18844256

 

Historical Information

Used throughout history as a perfume, incense and medicine.

 

The Ancient Egyptians used it in the mummification process, whilst the soldiers of Ancient Greece carried a bottle of oil with them into battle and used it as a styptic to stops wounds bleeding.

 

Listed in the Bible as one of the gifts to the newborn Jesus along with Gold and Frankincense.

 
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